State adds two initiatives to fight drug epidemic

The Indiana Family and Social Services Administration unveiled two initiatives as part of the state’s effort to attack the drug epidemic.

First, the Next Level Recovery website, www.in.gov/recovery, now has a new geolocation feature designed to help Hoosiers find Division of Mental Health and Addiction-certified addiction treatment providers throughout the state.

Additionally, FSSA is preparing to open a new addiction residential treatment unit specializing in opioid use disorder at Richmond State Hospital to support Hoosiers with an immediate need of services, particularly those in East Central Indiana.   

The new web portal, found under the “treatment” tab at www.in.gov/recovery allows individuals to search for certified inpatient, outpatient, residential and opioid treatment providers by location, treatment option and populations served (adult or adolescent/male or female). The portal will display helpful information such as payment types accepted by each provider and whether the facility is near public transportation. 

“This new online feature puts critical information right into the palms of the hands of people who need it most – those who are struggling with addiction and are ready to find help,” said FSSA Secretary Jennifer Walthall, M.D., M.P.H.

www.IN.gov/recovery, launched in October 2017, offers information for health professionals, emergency personnel, law enforcement, community leaders and persons with substance use disorder and their families.

The website is one of several enhancements Indiana is making to provide a variety of ways to connect people to the right care at the right time.

The new 22-bed addiction residential treatment unit at Richmond State Hospital is expected to open by the end of March. It is the result of DMHA’s recent search for existing and available state assets to try to meet immediate need for opioid use disorder treatment.

The state also has a campaign underway to educate Hoosiers about opioid use disorder and has launched a website, www.KnowTheOFacts.org where people can learn more about the disease.